Archive for the ‘Class resources’ Category

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Group project: Digital Skies

April 6, 2017

For this project you are required to create a single artwork as a member of a team – a large-scale group canvas. Each individual team member will research and generate their own images which will be combined by the team into a final composite image for exhibition in Cape Able Gallery. The exhibition will open in late May on a date to be announced.

Digital Skies

Digital Skies: Art and Utopian Thought

For the opening of the exhibition each group give a short talk to present their work, and discuss the experience of working in a team, virtually, collaboratively. This will be followed by a crit.

Each participant must also describe the progress of the project in a weekly blog post with particular emphasis on their contribution to the project. (What are you bringing to the group and how does it fit into the team’s work?) Discuss the details of the project and also the issues that arise in working collaboratively online. How easy is it meet up virtually and plan the project? What difficulties arise in development? How easy or difficult is communication? What particular problems arise and how do you deal with them? Focus on the experience rather than writing a ‘correct’ post or having an answer for every difficulty.

See page 6 Module assessment for assessment criteria applying to this project.

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Group project: Who’s watching you?

October 6, 2016

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For the project you will explore the concept of your digital identity and it’s importance to you and anyone else. In your groups you will research the traces each of you has already left online, your digital footprint: what you are sharing? what can others learn about you? who might be watching you? who owns the information you might have thought was private? And, most importantly, what value might it have to others and what are they doing with it?

The tacit agreement most of us make when we engage online is that our personal details, behaviour, preferences, likes and dislikes and so on will be shared in exchange for the ‘free’ availability of useful or entertaining apps, games, tools, services etc. Most of us share apparently innocuous information online on a daily basis. Taken on their own, these nuggets of personal information seem harmless but, when they are aggregated the result can be a surprisingly comprehensive profile of our behaviour. The corporations engaged in this activity protect themselves by asking us to agree to Terms of Reference when signing up for services but, does anybody read the terms? and if you do read them have you ever decided against proceeding to sign up?

This information is gathered legally and often shared legally. But in addition, there are more sinister operators at work in the so-called ‘dark web’. They will seek to break encrypted information you may reasonably expect to be kept secret: credit card details from legitimate online purchases for example.

In the early incarnation of the world wide web it was often compared with the wild west of the US, a new frontier with little regulation or law enforcement. While that has now changed and much activity is in fact regulated the fact remains that we are in new territory. As major corporations gather information the unexpected consequences of the ‘big data’ phenomenon is only beginning to emerge.

For the project you are to research the digital footprint of your group members. Consider all your online activity, whether through social media, shopping, gaming, correspondence, searching and researching, downloading, communicating and so on. Build a picture of the shadow you are leaving behind, the information that might remain online for others to find. Analyse the impact this may have and envisage a scenario where it might be used by unscrupulous operators to their own benefit.

Present your findings in an entertaining, informative and lively manner using whatever medium and format you wish as long as it can be stored for later review (e.g. a talk, short film, narration+visuals).

Each participant must also describe the progress of the project in a weekly blog post with particular emphasis on their contribution to the project. (What are you bringing to the group and how does it fit into the team’s work?) Discuss the details of the project and also the issues that arise in working collaboratively online. How easy is it meet up virtually and plan the project? What difficulties arise in development? How easy or difficult is communication? What particular problems arise and how do you deal with them? Focus on the experience rather than writing a ‘correct’ post or having an answer for every difficulty.

See page 6 Module assessment for assessment criteria applying to this project.

Important note: If you use images or sound be mindful of copyright, particularly as presentations will be posted to the module blog.

Presentations should be no less than 5 minutes and no more than 10 minutes in duration.

Your presentation can be made in the DIT campus or any appropriate venue selected by the group. Presentation date is normal class time on Thursday 8th December.

Reading and watching list:

Fake It – to control your digital identity In a 2013 TEDx Oxford presentation Danish journalist Pernille Tranberg, who wrote the book Fake It – Your Guide to Digital Self-defense with the German journalist Steffan Heuer, explains what happens with your data, what it can cost you now and in years to come.

The Power of Privacy In this 2016 film by The Guardian, Aleks Krotoski travels the world to undergo challenges that explore our digital life in the 21st century. Watch her be stalked and hacked, fight to get leaked documents back, dive into open data and live in a futuristic home that monitors her every move.

Is someone watching you online? The security risks of the Internet of Things is outlined in this 2016 article from The Conversation by Patryk Szewczyk and Nikolai Hampton.

Who’s watching me on the internet? Technology Correspondent for the BBC, Rory Cellan-Jones writes about our digital footprint and explains data trails in iWonder 2016.

Mockumentary made by Limerick School of Art and Design students in 2014 on how NOT to do a group project. (Only to be used for light relief.)

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Group project: 21st Century workplace

March 10, 2016

future workplace

The project is to predict and describe the workplace in 2050. You will need to imagine how you will be working by the middle of the 21st Century. Will people still gather in physical offices or is it more likely that we will stay at home and work online? How will technological developments influence the way in which we work? What kinds of jobs will still need people to meet in a physical location?

Each team will be required to describe an imagined workplace in 2050 in a ten minute presentation in SL. The presentation should be supported with visuals as appropriate and each team member must present part of the project.

The presentation should also discuss the experience of the team members working collaboratively online. Describe the issues that arose during the preparation of the presentation: how easy it was to meet up online? what difficulties arose around clear communication and arriving at agreement? how did you plan? how did you resolve problems?

See page 6 Module assessment for assessment criteria applying to this project.

Project presentations will be made on Thursday 12th May 2016 at 8.00 pm.

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Group project: Building in SL

October 30, 2015

The project is to explore SL to find an interesting building. By ‘interesting’ we mean:

  1. the design (interior or exterior);
  2. the purpose (what use the building has been designed for);
  3. the actual use of the building (it may be that it ends up having a different use than the original purpose);
  4. the type of people who visit, own or use the building; etc etc.

For the project each pair of students will visit at least five possible buildings before selecting one to work with. The building must be open to the public (or, in the case of a private dwelling, permission should be sought from the owner) and freely accessible. The rationale for selection is to be developed and a presentation made to support your choice. The presentation should describe the building drawing attention to the key aspects that make it interesting. It should also describe the building in context:

  1. how it fits into the immediate environment;
  2. its fitness for purpose;
  3. the use to which it is being put;
  4. the origin of the building;
  5. how and why it was built;
  6. whether or not it is considered a success by its owner, builder, users, neighbours etc.

The presentation should also give the audience a flavour of the building.

The presentation can be made in or near the building or in any other appropriate venue selected by the group/pair. It should last between 5 and 10 minutes. Presentation date is normal class time on Thursday 10th December.

Each participant should also describe the progress of the project in a weekly blog post. Discuss the details of the project and also the issues that arise in working collaboratively online. How easy is it meet up virtually and plan the project? What difficulties arise in development? How easy or difficult is communication? What particular problems arise and how do you deal with them?

See page 6 Module assessment for assessment criteria applying to this project.

Important note: If you use images or sound be mindful of copyright, particularly as presentations will be posted to the module blog.

Central station, Amsterdam

Central station, Amsterdam

Mocha cathedral

Mocha cathedral

Falling Water

Falling Water

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Group Project: Going Global

February 12, 2015

Coined in the 1960s by Canadian intellectual Marshall McLuhan the term ‘global village‘ is becoming a reality in today’s society. This is seen in how news spreads, the connections people make, working patterns and day to day life – shopping, socialising, communicating etc. The world of online digital communication in the form of the web, social media, virtual worlds and so on is becoming an integral part of the professional experience. No longer restricted by physical geography professional collaboration crosses cultural boundaries and time zones. The ability to work effectively in this environment is essential for those joining the 21st Century workforce. Familiarity with the legal frameworks, social conventions and etiquette that frame this online environment is a prerequisite to success.

For the project each student group will explore this theme by identifying a cause or charity anywhere in the world, and taking it global. Use the social media platforms of your choice to raise the profile of your cause or charity beyond the local boundaries. Groups will present their projects on either 30th April class or 7th May class. The presentation will be in the form of a Pecha Kucha and will highlight your work, your group dynamic, and the impact; and describe the challenges encountered as you worked with the cause or charity. 20 images x 20 secs each.

For tips, examples and resources, see Catherine Cronin’s blog.

In summary: working in your group, design a campaign to manage your digital footprint; and at the same time work with your group to raise the profile of a cause or charity beyond local or geographical boundaries using social media and online platforms. At the end of the campaign, design a PK presentation to showcase all you did and your experience. Emphasis is on the experience rather than the result. But results will be noticed too.

Important note: If you use images or sound be mindful of copyright, particularly as presentations will be posted to the module blog.

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If you haven’t already done so, read this book.

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Class 2: Online collaboration

February 6, 2015

020515 - class with Site

Class started with a selection of students delivering their elevator pitches. Really good work and well presented from everyone. The class has an interesting mix of students from healthcare, creative and cultural backgrounds.

Sitearm Madonna kicked off his Team-building talk by asking who had worked in a successful team. Most people had some experience. He shared his online slide presentation using a narrative to set the scene, and then referring to the slides to highlight how teams are built: Form–Storm–Norm–Perform. He noted that the Storm stage is probably the most uncomfortable but, it passes!

When your team gets to the Norm stage, it is imperative, that you have ground rules in place, for example: agree to entertain all ideas without criticism; remember nothing is too wild; everyone has something to contribute. He also suggested that teams may need to move between brainstorming and deciding quite a few times before settling on a final direction.

Review slide 5 to see how he identified the effective team roles. Using the narrative with which he began he highlighted how this played out when four team members had to work together. Sometimes, you will find that one person may take on more than one role, or there may be more than one person with a single role.

A notecard with the Student Groups was circulated so that you can start to get to know each other. (For those who missed class the notecard will be added to the class group #iole15 so make sure you have joined and activated the group next time you visit Second Life.) We have nine teams with four members each, and have tried to make each group as diverse as possible. You will need to work collaboratively online and we encourage you to support one other. Working in groups online is much the same as in real life, so spend time together and get past the Form and Storm stages in good time.

The brief for the Group Project work will be presented in next week’s class.

Sitearm Madonna is online, as are all of the guest speakers you will meet throughout the course. Find him @sitearm and his blog.

ACTIVITIES FOR NEXT CLASS:

  1. Explore: Get to know your group members and explore SL with your group. You are to visit at least 3 locations that are new to you. Find them in search, or ask other residents for recommendations or select them at random. Also find a blog that interests you and review it with respect to subject area, engagement, profile of blogger, etc. Can be a hobby, any interest… 
  2. Discuss: with your group how you would like to operate, what ground rules might be helpful, and who might take on different roles. Think about what skills you have now have collectively.
  3. Write the second post : on your blog reviewing the locations you visited. Explain how and why you chose them and what relevance they might have for your group.
  4. Read: The Lazy Person’s Guide to Personal Branding by Yohana Desta at Mashable or Personal Branding Basics by Chris Brogan, expert in online community, social media, and related technologies or The first Step to Building Your Personal Brand from Forbes.
  5. Other interesting reading about SL and virtual worlds:
    in Virtual Worlds Magazine, Virtual Anthropology and the Prometheus myth
    An article about Rod Humble, former CEO of Linden Labs, owner of Second Life Shared created spaces
    Your Second Life is Ready – Popular Science’s take on SL in 2006.
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Class 5: Content creation

March 14, 2014

Ham Rambler 1_001CLASS SUMMARY:

Ham Rambler (above) and Sitearm Madonna spoke on the development of content in the online environment. Sitearm covered the following points:

  • Content Creation – what constitutes content, how is it generated?
  • Value – does your content have any value?
  • Sharing your content – making it available, generating an income.
  • Use and protection of online content – copyright and Intellectual Property (IP) issues.
  • Consider your content for the end project.

Ham talked about the use of corporate trademarks in Second Life and the reaction of global brands to seeing themselves appear in the virtual world. The various methodologies for protecting content including copyright, trademark registration and patents were discussed. A question about the copyright of book titles focussed on what might not be protected (see You Thought We Wouldn’t Notice…) The development of digital and online content has led to a new approach to sharing under the Creative Commons system.  Finally, we referred to Bruns’ Consumer – Prosumer – Produser proposition brought about by the web (see last weeks list of activities).

Sitearm Madonna’s slides are available here:
Content creation examples and tips
Creating content inside and outside of Second Life (with an emphasis on team working)
Tips and tools for online virtual collaboration and team working

Some other interesting links from Sitearm:
Soundtracks from the Is One Life Enough Song Contest
YouTube video of the Second Life Build A Robot Contest Winners

ACTIVITIES FOR NEXT CLASS:

1. Read: Content licensing in Virtual Worlds (accessed on 03/14/14) a thoughtful blog post about the legal issues around protecting ‘things’ you create in Second Life. Read the comments also.

2. Read The Laws of Virtual Worlds (accessed on 03/14/14) from the California Law Review 2003 this is an excellent, if highly specialised, review of the legal position of avatars in virtual worlds.

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